1. "Sketches of Shating’  by Huang Binhong 黃賓虹 (1865-1955). Album of twelve leaves, ink on paper. Dimensions: 22 x 16 1/4 in. (55.9 x 41.3 cm). Date: 20th century. Accession Number: 1986.267.134a–l

    From the Metropolitan Museum website:

    These landscape compositions are “picturesque” in a sense defined by a long tradition of landscape art in China. Huang’s means of defining form by delineating edges without texture patterning and recording with the hand what the eye traces, however, is a radical departure for Chinese painting. It proved an interim step for Huang Binhong on his road to a late landscape style in which the qualities of ink were again exploited and ink resumed its traditional place alongside brushline as the paired tools of description and expression.

    Source: Metropolitan Museum (more images)

  2. "Sketches of Twelve Strange Mountain Peaks" by Huang Binhong 黃賓虹. Date: c. 1935. Album of twelve leaves, ink on paper. Dimensions: 22 x 16.5 in (55.9 x 41.9 cm). Accession Number: 1986.267.203a–l

    From the Metropolitan Museum:
    "In this album, Huang Binhong (1865-1955) uses a remarkably fresh linear style to depict a series of famous mountain sites in China. A consummate literatus, Huang Binhong had his first opportunity to travel extensively when he was in his sixties. He produced thousands of sketches in response to new sights and transformed his style, shedding the traditional vocabulary of brushstrokes, unlearning what he had cultivated for years, to develop through contour drawing a more direct means of depicting what he saw. This series of sketches utilizes the popular travel gazetteer format, typically published in woodblock print editions."

    Source: Metropolitan Museum

  3. 申凡 Shen Fan’s (born 1952) “Landscape Commemorating Huang Binhong Scroll” (2007). Installation with lights and sound.
This is a neon wall that pays homage to the art historian and literati painter Huang Binhong 黃賓虹 (1865-1955). Each neon tube represents a brushstroke and lights up one tube at a time over the course of an hour, accompanied by the sounds of a qin.
via: boinboing.net

    申凡 Shen Fan’s (born 1952) “Landscape Commemorating Huang Binhong Scroll” (2007). Installation with lights and sound.

    This is a neon wall that pays homage to the art historian and literati painter Huang Binhong 黃賓虹 (1865-1955). Each neon tube represents a brushstroke and lights up one tube at a time over the course of an hour, accompanied by the sounds of a qin.

    via: boinboing.net

  4. Lu Xinjian’s installation, “City Light,” developed from Google Earth imagery of Shanghai’s city centre uses neon tubes to visualize the city’s DNA. Running on a flash program, the work illuminates the urban growth and expansion. 

    Artist website

    Source: designboom

  5. He An 何岸 (born 1971) repurposes vintage neon signs, formerly the names of shops, companies and nightclubs, to spell his deceased father’s name (He Taoyuan) along with the name of a Japanese soft porn actress (Miho Yoshioka). His work deals with the physical and psychological landscape of China’s growing cities. He started incorporating neon light-box characters, sometimes stolen from signage found in cities like Shenzhen and Wuhan.

    Sources: Carnegie Museum of Art, Galerie Daniel Templon

  6. Typography of neon signs 霓虹的字體, presented by M+, Hong Kong’s museum for visual culture and its interactive online exhibition NEONSIGNS.HK.

  7. mousingsmail:

Hong Kong(Photographer: Keith Macgregor)

    mousingsmail:

    Hong Kong
    (Photographer: Keith Macgregor)

  8. Christopher Doyle on filming in Hong Kong’s neon world. Presented as part of NEONSIGNS.HK, an online exhibition on Hong Kong’s neon signs, by M+, West Kowloon Cultural District.

  9. A short documentary on the creation, culture, and industry of neon signs in Hong Kong by M+, West Kowloon Cultural District, as part of their interactive online exhibition, NEONSIGNS.HK. These neons are disappearing from the visual landscape as LED signs are a cheaper (although more polluting) alternative for shopkeepers.

    From a Huffington Post article on the exhibition and the film:

    "Like all consuming professions, the world of neon is a hermetic one, and its inhabitants speak in a kind of code. “Chicken intestine,” “thousand layer paper,” “light head,” “iron heart transformers”: the video’s concern with such minutiae makes it both fascinating and sad to watch. The men profiled — all longtime neon manufacturers — speak of their work with the same mix of despair and submission as a farmer after a bad harvest. “Who can bear it?” asks one, before walking the videographer through the careful process of giving a sign life." 

  10. Part 3 of a Museum of Vancouver documentary on the neon signs in downtown Vancouver.