1. United China Relief was an organization in the 1940s which brought together different philanthropic organizations operating in China. Its fundraising campaigns which raised money need to help Chinese refugees during the war, were publicized by posters such as these. The representation of the Chinese in WWII poster art were sympathetic and they were depicted in a realistic fashion (albeit with a hint of idealism and romanticism), quite in contrast with previous caricatures and stereotypes of the Chinese in earlier decades as short, pig-tailed, long-clawed aliens.

    Image 1: WWII-US. A Chinese patriot looks up as aircraft circle around him. A Chinese man in military uniform and cap looks toward the sky. Several tiny planes circle him. The planes and his cap bear the 12-pointed sun symbol of the Chinese forces. Near the right edge of the poster are four Chinese characters in red which roughly translate as “Unite Against the Enemy and Rebuild Our Nation.” Artist: Gaydos. Size: 56 x 36 cm. Date: between 1941-1946? 

    Image 2: “This man is your friend: Chinese: he fights for freedom”. Photograph of a smiling Chinese soldier in uniform with cap. Creator: United States, Office of Facts and Figures, in 1942. 

    Source: University of North Texas, George Marshall Foundation

  2. "United Nations Fight for Freedom." Boy Scouts in front of Capitol, helping the war effort by delivering posters. Photographer: John Rous. Date: 1943.
Source: Library of Congress

    "United Nations Fight for Freedom." Boy Scouts in front of Capitol, helping the war effort by delivering posters. Photographer: John Rous. Date: 1943.

    Source: Library of Congress

  3. missmillay:

Edna attending a benefit raising money for the United China Relief.

Is this the same benefit as the United China Relief Banquet Edna St. Vincent Millay was asked to read a poem in 1940? (“Edna St. Vincent Millay in the Village: The Men in Millay’s Life.” Anne Cheney. The Village Voice, Sept. 1, 1975, p.41-43).

    missmillay:

    Edna attending a benefit raising money for the United China Relief.

    Is this the same benefit as the United China Relief Banquet Edna St. Vincent Millay was asked to read a poem in 1940? (“Edna St. Vincent Millay in the Village: The Men in Millay’s Life.” Anne Cheney. The Village Voice, Sept. 1, 1975, p.41-43).

  4. Chinese American women in cheongsam solicit contribution funds for the 1941 United China Relief fundraising campaign which aimed to raise $5 million in relief funds for China. Published by Los Angeles’ Daily news, ca. 1941.
Source: University of California Libraries

    Chinese American women in cheongsam solicit contribution funds for the 1941 United China Relief fundraising campaign which aimed to raise $5 million in relief funds for China. Published by Los Angeles’ Daily news, ca. 1941.

    Source: University of California Libraries

  5. A group of Chinese women and girls dressed in hula skirts for a fundraising event for the anti-Japanese war. One of the girls in the photograph (seated) is Norma Hodge (nee Quon). Mabel Wang is in the first person on the left standing. Girl seated third from the right is Jean (Mabel Wang’s sister). Probably taken in the rooms of the Chung Hwa Kung Hwei. Date: c. 1936-1937. Place: Melbourne, Australia.

Source: Chinese-Australian Historical Images in Australia

    A group of Chinese women and girls dressed in hula skirts for a fundraising event for the anti-Japanese war. One of the girls in the photograph (seated) is Norma Hodge (nee Quon). Mabel Wang is in the first person on the left standing. Girl seated third from the right is Jean (Mabel Wang’s sister). Probably taken in the rooms of the Chung Hwa Kung Hwei. Date: c. 1936-1937. Place: Melbourne, Australia.

    Source: Chinese-Australian Historical Images in Australia

  6. Dorothy Toy and Paul Wing tapdancing in “With Best Wishes” (1939).

  7. Rick Quan’s documentary on Asian American pioneer and tap dancer, Dorothy Toy.

  8. Dorothy Toy and Paul Wing in the 1937 musical short “Deviled Ham”

  9. Tap dancers Dorothy Takahasi Toy and Paul Wing in 1950 at San Francisco’s Forbidden City nightclub. Toy was profiled in Amy Gorman’s book, “Aging Artfully: 12 Profiles: Visual & Performing Women Artists Aged 85-105” (2006).
Source: Agingartfully.com

    Tap dancers Dorothy Takahasi Toy and Paul Wing in 1950 at San Francisco’s Forbidden City nightclub. Toy was profiled in Amy Gorman’s book, “Aging Artfully: 12 Profiles: Visual & Performing Women Artists Aged 85-105” (2006).

    Source: Agingartfully.com

  10. One of dancer Tony Wing’s first dancing gig after serving in the army in WWII, was as a guest artist at Eddie Pond’s Kublai Khan nightclub, using the stage name of “Tony Costa” (although his birth name was Gonzalo Anthony Lagrimas). He later changed his stage name to “Tony Wing” to further his career in the Chinese nightclub scene and spent most of his long dancing career at Charlie Low’s Forbidden City nightclub. He worked there until the early 1960s, after which he turned to teaching dance at the Chinese YMCA and in his own studio in Oakland. 

    Image 1: Tony Wing and unidentified dancing partner at the Kubla Khan in the 1940s.

    Image 2: Tony Wing and chorus girls in 1954.

    (Photos from Forbidden City: The Golden Age of Chinese Nightclubs)

    Source: Found SF