1. Two Chinese women discussing groceries in Edmonton’s Chinatown as a policeman watches. Date unknown. Unidentified photographer.
Source: University of Calgary

    Two Chinese women discussing groceries in Edmonton’s Chinatown as a policeman watches. Date unknown. Unidentified photographer.

    Source: University of Calgary

  2. A view showing the exterior of a Chinese herb store in a Californian Chinatown. Taken by Peter Stackpole in 1937.
Source: LIFE Magazine

    A view showing the exterior of a Chinese herb store in a Californian Chinatown. Taken by Peter Stackpole in 1937.

    Source: LIFE Magazine

  3. Street scenes through San Francisco’s Chinatown taken by Charles W. Cushman between Dec. 14, 1952 and April 23, 1955. Views of Grant Ave., Power St., and Jackson St.

    Source: Indiana University Archives- 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

  4. Store windows in New York Chinatown, Oct. 7, 1942. Photographer: Charles W. Cushman. Archives ID: P02708, P02706.

    Source: Indiana University Archives- 1, 2

  5. Men reading the newspaper outside of the Chinese Times office in a Californian Chinatown. Date: 1937 (image 1) and 1941 (image 2). Photographer: Peter Stackpole.

    Source: LIFE Magazine- 1, 2

  6. Vancouver Chinatown rooming house, December 1902. Unidentified photographer.
Source: CBC, British Columbia Archives

    Vancouver Chinatown rooming house, December 1902. Unidentified photographer.

    Source: CBC, British Columbia Archives

  7. Rooming house interior, circa 1940. Views of bedroom, bathtub and sink in a rented room above the popular Chinese-owned restaurant, the Pan-American Café at 152 North Market, Wichita (Kansas). The room was occupied by King Mar who immigrated to the United States in 1914 and managed the café for 51 years (1928-1969). Unknown photographer.

    Source: Wichita-Sedgwick County Historical Museum- 1, 2

  8. 18mr:

    Two new exhibits of photographs at the Museum of Chinese in the Americas feature intimate portraits of the residents of New York’s Chinatown and a look at its changing landscape. Full exhibition preview here.

  9. 宋冬 Song Dong’s installation “Waste Not 物尽其用” displays over 10,000 domestic objects owned by his late mother Zhao Xiangyuan, who refused to throw anything away if it could possibly be reused. Collected over a period of five decades, Zhao’s experience of poverty during China’s turmoils in the 1950s and 1960s led to the habit of saving things from metal pots to bottle caps, toothpaste tubes, and toys and to store them in her tiny house in Beijing. The activity of saving and re-using things reflects the principle of wu jin qi yong – ‘waste not’ – a prerequisite for survival during periods of social and political turmoil. Following the death of her husband in 2002, Zhao’s desire to hoard was taken to the extremes and began to have an impact on her standard of living. Song and his sister, Song Hui, managed to improve the quality of Zhao’s life while respecting her wish of “waste not” by persuading her to let him use her possessions as an art installation. Unexpectedly and tragically, Song’s mother died in an accident in 2009, and each time Song Dong remakes the work assisted by his sister and his wife, the family is brought together again. This is a poignant piece that speaks of not only of Zhao’s life and the modern history China as experienced by one family, but also of those family bonds, and the ability of objects to speak of their past.

    Sources: New York TimesCulture360

  10. Hao Junchen’s photograph, “Hugging a portrait of his deceased wife, an elderly man fulfills their dream of visiting Beiijing” (2003).
via: Art Blart blog 

    Hao Junchen’s photograph, “Hugging a portrait of his deceased wife, an elderly man fulfills their dream of visiting Beiijing” (2003).

    via: Art Blart blog