1. Photograph taken by C.D. Hoy in the 1920s of a young Chinese girl sitting on a wooden chair in front of a dark cloth backdrop. Possibly Evelyn Hoy. She is wearing a buttoned up sweater, skirt, and thermal leggings.
Source: Barkerville Collections

    Photograph taken by C.D. Hoy in the 1920s of a young Chinese girl sitting on a wooden chair in front of a dark cloth backdrop. Possibly Evelyn Hoy. She is wearing a buttoned up sweater, skirt, and thermal leggings.

    Source: Barkerville Collections

  2. A young girl wearing a large straw hat in Wuzhou. Taken between 1912-1945. Unidentified photographer. Record ID: impa-m5827
Source: USC Library

    A young girl wearing a large straw hat in Wuzhou. Taken between 1912-1945. Unidentified photographer. Record ID: impa-m5827

    Source: USC Library

  3. Wartime Chinese orphans with their hands over their ears as they sing a bombing song, “Oom, Oom, Oom” (the sound of the planes) at an orphanage funded by United China Relief, a central U.S. organization for eight Chinese aid societies. Taken in Chungking, July 1941 by Margaret Bourke-White for LIFE Magazine.

    Sources: Google Cultural Institute, Chenmodemaque blog

  4. Harold Bucklin took a year-long journey from Providence, Rhode Island to Shanghai, China between 1923-24 with his wife and son to serve as Visiting Professor of Sociology at Shanghai College, as part of a program at Brown University, where he was Assistant Professor of Sociology. During this time, he produced an exquisite body of large-format photographs of Pre-Revolutionary China, including these two images of children in the countryside.

    Source: Bucklin Archives- 1, 2

  5. Beijing primary school model aircraft group. From 人民画报 People’s Pictorial 1973 10.

    Source: 齐人善宝 

  6. Mechanical toy goldfish, made in China between 1975-1979. The goldfish is lithographed tinplate and plastic with a clockwork mechanism. It is red, gold and white with black markings. The eyes and nose/mouth are made in plastic, as is the tail fin. When wound up, the goldfish moves on two wheels and the side fins open and close. Size: 5 (h) x 9.5 (w) x 11.5 (l) cm

    Source: Victoria & Albert Museum

  7. The collaborative lacquer paintings and posters of the Luo Brothers 罗氏兄弟 subverts the traditional New Year Print or nianhua as well as propaganda posters through the juxtaposition of traditional folk art, symbolism, and objects of Western consumerism. In pre-communist China, nianhua was the most popular auspicious poster-form of expressing good luck and happiness, long life, and wealth, with New Year prints devoted to children as the most popular.

    Sources: Queensland Art Gallery, Opera Gallery, ArtSpeak China, Australian Arts Digest,

  8. "Welcome the world famous brand" (2000) by the Luo Brothers. Collage and lacquer on wood. Size: 126 x 246 cm.
From the museum website:

'Welcome the world famous brand' is a lacquer and collage work depicting at one instance those symbols of a traditional China, peasant life and harvest festival. The predominant image of the tiger, often a symbol of power and courage, and sometimes represented as the God of Wealth, are flanked by a prolific number of chubby, rosy cheeked children once popular on calendars and propaganda posters. Other symbols include the lotus flowers (symbol of purity and perfection) upon which children are standing, carriages full of gifts, even the Gate of Heavenly Peace (in a TV set). Juxtaposed and intermingled with such 'Chinese' symbols are the objects of Western consumerism, which have progressively entered the mainstream economy of China. Products such as Coca-Cola, Sony batteries, television sets, mobile phones, watches, faxes, Wriggly chewing gum etc. What we are confronted with is a pandemonium of both Western capitalism and Chinese traditional culture mixed together in an ever more globalised, unsightly world. In effect the work itself is a parody of a well balanced, glossy type advertisement.

Source: Art Gallery of New South Wales

    "Welcome the world famous brand" (2000) by the Luo Brothers. Collage and lacquer on wood. Size: 126 x 246 cm.

    From the museum website:

    'Welcome the world famous brand' is a lacquer and collage work depicting at one instance those symbols of a traditional China, peasant life and harvest festival. The predominant image of the tiger, often a symbol of power and courage, and sometimes represented as the God of Wealth, are flanked by a prolific number of chubby, rosy cheeked children once popular on calendars and propaganda posters. Other symbols include the lotus flowers (symbol of purity and perfection) upon which children are standing, carriages full of gifts, even the Gate of Heavenly Peace (in a TV set). Juxtaposed and intermingled with such 'Chinese' symbols are the objects of Western consumerism, which have progressively entered the mainstream economy of China. Products such as Coca-Cola, Sony batteries, television sets, mobile phones, watches, faxes, Wriggly chewing gum etc. What we are confronted with is a pandemonium of both Western capitalism and Chinese traditional culture mixed together in an ever more globalised, unsightly world. In effect the work itself is a parody of a well balanced, glossy type advertisement.


    Source: Art Gallery of New South Wales

  9. "Welcome! Welcome! - Rocket" by the Luo Brothers 罗氏兄弟. Oil on canvas.
The three Luo Brothers, Weidong (1963), Weiguo (1972), and Weibing (1964), are known for their kitsch paintings that play off traditional Chinese and Western symbols as a celebration of global consumer culture. They are aligned with the post-1989 ‘Gaudy Art’ movement that was a satire on kitsch, questioning of Pop, through the medium of Chinese lacquer for the Luo Brothers. Their work is inspired in part by New Year calendar and propaganda posters with their chubby children, peony flowers, while intermingling objects of Western consumerism such as Coca-Cola, television sets, mobile phones, etc. and modern advertising images.
Sources: Artspeak China, Yang Gallery

    "Welcome! Welcome! - Rocket" by the Luo Brothers 罗氏兄弟. Oil on canvas.

    The three Luo Brothers, Weidong (1963), Weiguo (1972), and Weibing (1964), are known for their kitsch paintings that play off traditional Chinese and Western symbols as a celebration of global consumer culture. They are aligned with the post-1989 ‘Gaudy Art’ movement that was a satire on kitsch, questioning of Pop, through the medium of Chinese lacquer for the Luo Brothers. Their work is inspired in part by New Year calendar and propaganda posters with their chubby children, peony flowers, while intermingling objects of Western consumerism such as Coca-Cola, television sets, mobile phones, etc. and modern advertising images.

    Sources: Artspeak China, Yang Gallery

  10. "Neon Pink Clouds" by Lisa Anderson. Neon glass on aluminium framework. Approx. 1.2 metres across.
bluntcrayon:

Lisa Anderson, “Neon Cloud (Chinoiserie)”
That’s DOCTOR Lisa Anderson to you. Her interview with Richard Fidler is well worth a read, and is featured on her website. 

    "Neon Pink Clouds" by Lisa Anderson. Neon glass on aluminium framework. Approx. 1.2 metres across.

    bluntcrayon:

    Lisa Anderson, “Neon Cloud (Chinoiserie)”

    That’s DOCTOR Lisa Anderson to you. Her interview with Richard Fidler is well worth a read, and is featured on her website