1. Typography of neon signs 霓虹的字體, presented by M+, Hong Kong’s museum for visual culture and its interactive online exhibition NEONSIGNS.HK.

  2. mousingsmail:

Hong Kong(Photographer: Keith Macgregor)

    mousingsmail:

    Hong Kong
    (Photographer: Keith Macgregor)

  3. Christopher Doyle on filming in Hong Kong’s neon world. Presented as part of NEONSIGNS.HK, an online exhibition on Hong Kong’s neon signs, by M+, West Kowloon Cultural District.

  4. A short documentary on the creation, culture, and industry of neon signs in Hong Kong by M+, West Kowloon Cultural District, as part of their interactive online exhibition, NEONSIGNS.HK. These neons are disappearing from the visual landscape as LED signs are a cheaper (although more polluting) alternative for shopkeepers.

    From a Huffington Post article on the exhibition and the film:

    "Like all consuming professions, the world of neon is a hermetic one, and its inhabitants speak in a kind of code. “Chicken intestine,” “thousand layer paper,” “light head,” “iron heart transformers”: the video’s concern with such minutiae makes it both fascinating and sad to watch. The men profiled — all longtime neon manufacturers — speak of their work with the same mix of despair and submission as a farmer after a bad harvest. “Who can bear it?” asks one, before walking the videographer through the careful process of giving a sign life." 

  5. Part 3 of a Museum of Vancouver documentary on the neon signs in downtown Vancouver.

  6. Part 2 of 3 in a 2012 documentary by the Museum of Vancouver on the rise and decline of Vancouver’s downtown neighbourhood on Hastings Street, as seen through its neon signs. At its peak, there were 2222 signs, and the abundance of neon signage on Hastings Street became an issue in the 1960s with anti-neon sentiments and restrictive neon sign bylaws in 1974. One block south on Pender Street, Chinatown’s striking neon signs faced a similar actions. Currently, there are around 23 signs in the Hastings-Chinatown neighbourhood.

    Source: Museum of Vancouver- The Visible City

  7. Vancouver’s Chinatown at night in the 1950s, including views of Ming’s, Bamboo Terrace, and Chungking Chop Suey. In the Chung Collection of UBC Library.

    Source: UBC Library- 123

  8. 1961 photo of the Bamboo Terrace Chinese restaurant, located on East Pender Street in Vancouver’s Chinatown. From The Province Newspaper. (VPL Accession Number: 2000A)
Source: Vancouver Public Library

    1961 photo of the Bamboo Terrace Chinese restaurant, located on East Pender Street in Vancouver’s Chinatown. From The Province Newspaper. (VPL Accession Number: 2000A)

    Source: Vancouver Public Library

  9. View looking on Pender from near Columbia, including Ho Ho Chinese Restaurant in Vancouver Chinatown, in 1961. Unidentified photographer for The Province Newspaper. (VPL Accession Number: 2001)
Source: Vancouver Public Library

    View looking on Pender from near Columbia, including Ho Ho Chinese Restaurant in Vancouver Chinatown, in 1961. Unidentified photographer for The Province Newspaper. (VPL Accession Number: 2001)

  10. Located on 109 East Hastings St. near Columbia, the Smilin’ Buddha Cabaret was at the centre of Vancouver’s music scene from the 1950s until the early 1990s. It began in 1952 when Harvey Lowe, Albert Kwan, and Wong Kwong Gim opened the Smilin’ Buddha Dine and Dance nightclub, and the neon sign was erected in 1953 by Wallace Neon. It was a late-night destination and supper club with nighttime performances at the cabaret by performers such as Chinese Canadian radio personality, Harvey Lowe. The Buddha became an independent music venue in the late 1970s and closed in the 1980s. The sign (the Buddha’s belly ripples) was later acquired by Vancouver rockers 54-50 who donated it to the Museum of Vancouver. 

    Image 1: Taken in 1958 by Fred Herzog.

    Images 2&3: Taken by Brian Kent for the Vancouver Sun in 1964.

    Image 4. The dimensions of the neon sign: 162.6 (high) x 315 (long) x 33 (deep) cm

    Sources: Vancouver Neon, Vancouver is Awesome, Montreal Gazette, Museum of Vancouver, The Visible City